Ahead in the Count

9th Inning…..Getting the “W”

 

 

So here I am, October 2006, 39 years young, a serious stress fracture in my forearm, 17 years of Professional Baseball, 8 organizations, and 4 foreign countries in the rear view mirror. I am looking at “What Now?”.   Throughout these writings, I have had a constant theme.  That being relationships, and opportunities that present themselves.  Over the course of my playing career, I had envisioned myself at some point instructing, or coaching, at some level.  Traveling the minor leagues on a bus again did not appeal to me.  My Triple A manager in Syracuse had mentioned a guys name to me in St Louis that had an indoor baseball facility named Dave Pregon.  After several discussions, we decided we liked each other enough to open a place together.   Going into this process, I ran the idea by my business savvy buddy, and co-writer, Brendan Sullivan.  Brendan gave me the name of a baseball enthusiast in St Louis, named Mark Gallion, who had coached area teams for quite some time.  Mark had graduated from Harvard business school, and was open to sharing thoughts about what was needed in a facility in St Louis.  In January of 2007 All-StarPerformance was opened.  All-StarPerformance is an 18,000 square foot indoor facility where we now give numerous lessons throughout the year, as well as rent cages to teams and individuals.  Over the course of the next year Mark, Dave myself, and another former Major Leaguer, Scott Cooper, who Mark knew from getting hitting instruction for his sons, started our team program, the St Louis Gamers.  We have tried to model our program after some of the top programs nation wide, including the Headfirst Gamers in Washington DC, who are not coincidentally headed up by Brendan Sullivan.  While both Gamer programs pride themselves on teaching the game of baseball at a high level, what separates both programs are the non baseball aspects that are instilled in our players.  Both programs have instructors, coaches, and mentors that played the game at high level.  These experiences give us instant credibility with the kids. Many programs have instructors with playing experience, but what we do with these opportunities is what separate’s us. Because of this credibility, we have an enormous opportunity, and obligation in our minds, to not only pass along baseball knowledge, but use teachable moments that only baseball can provide to impart life skills.  Teaching how to have poise, for example, in challenging situations, because of not only your physical preparation, but your mental preparation is a rewarding experience that we coaches might not otherwise have the opportunity to enjoy.  Watching a young athlete who is not used to failing deal with those emotions, and help him learn self control is satisfying as a coach. Helping, in small ways, to instill that character is what you are, and reputation is what others think of you, goes a long way in getting youngsters to take the high road, not necessarily the popular one.  Seeing an athlete realize that he may not be the most talented kid on the team take the initiative, through hard work, develop his skill set to be a significant contributor to the team is energizing.  So, while coaching at a Major University, or Major League organization, may be glamorous, what is truly rewarding is having the opportunity to affect young peoples lives in a significant way over the course of weeks, months, and seasons.  As I look back over my career, I realize how fortunate I was to have so many good men as mentors and coaches.  I am fortunate to be in the position to pass along wisdom pertaining to the game of baseball, but truly blessed to be in the position to help shape lives in the game of life.

February 12, 2009 - Posted by | On the Field, Overview / Background, Sports Around the World, written by Matt Whiteside

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