Ahead in the Count

City Ball

I grew up in upper Manhattan – and was lucky to be exposed to baseball early in life despite the urban setting.  The West Side Little League was established in 1985.  I joined up the following April, at age 8.  The same year, I was fortunate that my parents sent me to what-was-then a brand new baseball camp during the summers where I was taught the game, albeit on the shaved infields of Central Park.  Had I been five years older than I am, I wouldn’t have had the chance to play baseball until High School (my junior high school had no baseball team).

I now live in downtown DC, a few blocks away from Banneker Public High School.  Washington DC’s Mayor Adrian Fenty (whose twin boys are both young baseball players themselves) has made restoration of parks and athletic fields in DC’s urban center a priority.  Banneker HS has been a flagship example on this initiative – and now sports ten beautiful tennis courts, a top notch quarter-mile track, and a college-quality baseball diamond at the center of it all (by far the nicest yard in the District save for Nats Park).

After work tonight, I went over to Banneker to run on the track – and a game between Coolidge and Cardozo (both public High Schools in DC) was just starting.  The players were enthusiastic, energetic, and ready to play.  Unfortunately, the baseball was not very good (at all).  There were good athletes all over the field – but a lack of know-how really impedes the players’ ability to enjoy and excel at the game.

The home team’s pitcher provided a great example of the need for earlier exposure to baseball in cities.  The pitcher, a righty, had a very low elbow, derived very little power from his back side, and stepped way too far toward the first base dugout in his delivery.  Despite these significant flaws, the ball still left the young man’s hand with some good velocity, probably 80 mph.   Sadly, the pitcher left the game in the third innings, despite having given up only two runs… holding his right elbow.  He was clearly dismayed at the pain, and was frustrated because he didn’t know why it was happening.  If I were him, I’d rather play another sport too.

Based on what I saw at Banneker’s Field today, there is no shortage of enthusiasm for baseball in downtown DC (and presumably other cities).  But without early exposure to baseball  and its fundamentals, it will continue to be an uphill battle to make that enthusiasm stick.  I hope DC’s new jewel at Banneker High School will help.

May 18, 2009 - Posted by | Overview / Background, Uncategorized, written by John Bramlette | ,

1 Comment »

  1. You rarely here of a Major Leaguer who doesn’t start playing baseball until college, which makes it a far different sport than basketball where that happens regularly. The key is the early development of players in little league. Good points. But perhaps DC should have built a little league complex instead?

    Comment by Graeme | June 9, 2009


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